The Chiefs Zone: May 1, 2017

Kansas City Chiefs 2017 NFL Draft recap

The Kansas City Chiefs turned 10 of their draft picks into six. What did the Chiefs come away with and who can make an immediate impact? Farzin will answer those questions and let you know what you need to know about this draft class. Also, the Buffalo Bills fired their GM after the draft. Did the Chiefs cause this to happen? Farzin gets into that as well. Plus, one former Chiefs player misspells “Jets.”

The Chiefs Zone: April 27, 2017

Chiefs draft Patrick Mahomes

The Kansas City Chiefs traded up with the Buffalo Bills to acquire the 10th pick and selected quarterback Patrick Mahomes from Texas Tech. Many Chiefs fans, including Farzin, wanted DeShaun Watson. However, Farzin will tell you why you should still be ecstatic with this draft pick. Farzin goes over his strengths and how he can help this offense, as well as how the offense can help Mahomes. Farzin also shares one major concern: will he sit out the entire season? Farzin tells you when he should become the starter.

The Chiefs Zone: April 14, 2017

Special guest: Matt Miller from Bleacher Report

With the draft being less than two weeks away, Farzin brings in NFL draft scout and the NFL lead writer for Bleacher Report, Matt Miller. Matt dives into what the Chiefs will do with the 27th pick and whether the Chiefs will make a move at quarterback. We lost a legend in the NFL, and Farzin talks about his biggest NFL contribution. Plus, one company has become the new Jordan Crying Meme.

The Chiefs Zone: April 6, 2017

Will the Kansas City Chiefs trade up in the NFL Draft?

Tony Romo’s retirement shakes up the entire 2017 NFL Draft, which makes a big impact on the Kansas City Chiefs, assuming they are seeking a quarterback in the draft. Farzin looks at the first 26 picks of the NFL Draft and predicts which teams will select a quarterback and how many could go by the time Kansas City is on the clock. Should the Chiefs trade up? With who? Farzin answers that.

The Chiefs Zone: March 31, 2017

AFC West shift

For the second time this offseason, an AFC West team changes its location as the Kansas City Chiefs remain. The Oakland Raiders will move to Las Vegas in a couple of years, but this led to some angry Raiders fans in Oakland. Would you still be a Chiefs fan if the team left Kansas City? Farzin reads some of your answers on the podcast. We have an update on Travis Kelce, plus, Farzin explains why Chiefs fans shouldn’t let another fan give them a hard time about rooting for Tyreek Hill. Also, some sports fans take sports too seriously.

Cash, money and quarterbacks

If I could use one word to describe NFL contracts: outrageous. These contracts will only continue to grow as time goes on.

 

It does not matter whether a quarterback won a Super Bowl, a playoff game or if they’ve had success in the regular season. Quarterbacks seem to be demanding more money than ever, and they end up getting what they want.

 

Most recently, Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton hit the jackpot Monday morning in a six-year deal worth $96 million with a possibility to earn $115 million if the Bengals win playoff games. Is Dalton worth $115 million? I will break it down for you.

 

Let’s get one thing straight; Dalton has been impressive for the Bengals since being drafted out of TCU in 2011. In three years, he’s thrown for 80 touchdowns and 49 interceptions with more than 11,000 passing yards under his belt. Dalton has led the Bengals to the playoffs each season.

 

Andy Dalton has to be loving life with his new contract.

Andy Dalton has to be loving life with his new contract.

Throughout all of my time covering the Chiefs and the NFL with podcasting, blogging and traditional media since 2007, I learned there is one important factor you must consider when judging a football player. How does that player do in the biggest games, or more importantly, in the postseason? Can they consistently do well in big moments?

 

Dalton is 0-3 in the postseason as he’s thrown one touchdown, six interceptions and has been sacked nine times in all three games combined.

 

As a fan and someone who has covered football, I believe a player must earn a big contract by proving he can shine in the biggest games. Dalton has yet to do that. That is not to say he can’t ever do it, but at this moment, many fans are left scratching their heads over this.

 

Colin Kaepernick signed a six-year contract earlier this summer in which he can earn up to $126 million with at least $61 million in guaranteed money.

 

One month after helping the Baltimore Ravens win the Super Bowl in 2013, Joe Flacco scored big. He signed a six-year contract in which he can earn $120.60 million, including a $29 million bonus plus $30 million guaranteed. In the four postseason games the Ravens played throughout the 2013 playoffs, Flacco committed just one turnover, a fumble.

 

Sure, to go through a four-game postseason and commit only one turnover is imposing. But is that enough to throw a ton of money at a player? That is how it seems to be. Flacco’s contract was the biggest in NFL history until a month later.

 

It did not take long for Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers to steal that record after he landed a $110 million contract over the next five years.

 

Rodgers was not labeled as a greedy guy, because he proved he deserves a big contract. He had a 5-3 postseason record (now 5-4) including a Super Bowl win.

 

Out of the many players who have earned big-time contracts, only a few really deserve them. Rodgers is one of the few who deserve big contracts.

Out of the many players who have earned big-time contracts, only a few really deserve them. Rodgers is one of the few who deserve big contracts.

The fact is, NFL players, mostly quarterbacks, are expensive and their price seems to go up each year, even if they don’t stand out in big games.

 

I want to post a couple of contracts your way and explore possible outcomes in the future.

 

1. Ryan Tannehill has a 15-17 record as a starter for the Miami Dolphins while making $12.67 million throughout four years from his rookie contract, which he is halfway through.

 

2. Matt Cassel had one good season filling in for Tom Brady in New England. The Kansas City Chiefs trade a second-round pick for him. A few months before training camp, Cassel signs a six-year $63 million deal, but only got through four years with the Chiefs. He finished with a 19-28 record as a starter in Kansas City.

 

3. The Detroit Lions gave Matthew Stafford more money last year after extending him for three more years, adding $53 million. He is under contract through the 2017 season and will receive $41.5 million in guaranteed money. Stafford is 24-37 as a starter and has played in only one postseason game.

 

  • Ryan Tannehill – $12.67 in 4 years
  • Matt Cassel – $63 million in 6 years
  • Matthew Stafford – $53 million in 3 years

 

Let’s fast forward to 10 years later, in 2024. How much money could a player similar to the caliber of Tannehill make? Same question for Cassel and Stafford.

 

General managers need to be more aggressive when considering how much money they want to pay a quarterback (or any player) for a long period of time. If the quarterback can’t live up to expectations, the team’s success will be limited, and all the blame goes on the general manager for giving millions of dollars to a quarterback for underperforming.

 

Although Ryan Tannehill is a first-round draft pick, he isn't highly discussed as a top-tier or second-tier quarterback. But if he has one remarkable season, he may demand a lot of money.

Although Ryan Tannehill is a first-round draft pick, he isn’t highly discussed as a top-tier or second-tier quarterback. But if he has one remarkable season, he may demand a lot of money.

Every athlete who makes millions of dollars is capable of feeding their wife and kids, but also people outside of their immediate family. Many players simply demand a lot of money so they can take care of their own family members. Many people criticize players for wanting a lot of money for that reason.

 

However, anyone in their position would do the same thing. But making money in the nine figures through six years or less is too much and that’s honestly not necessary to take care of your family and members through an extended family.

 

I don’t know what the solution is to stopping players from earning a ridiculous amount, but there are people more qualified than me who can come up with one. What I do know is, the price of a quarterback will only grow each year. A college football freshman with a promising future has to feel good about the amount of money he could make one day.

Overhype misleads many NFL fans

Tom Brady was only a hot topic of discussion in training camp in 2008 when dealing with a nagging knee injury. In 2009, he was talked about a lot because of his return. Outside of that, Brady has never been a household name during training camp.

Tom Brady was only a hot topic of discussion in training camp in 2008 when dealing with a nagging knee injury. In 2009, he was talked about a lot because of his return. Outside of that, Brady has never been a household name during training camp.

Training camp is fully underway for all 32 NFL teams, and football fans are always ecstatic this time of the year. One of the many treats about training camp is that fans are given access to attend certain practices and watch some of the grueling position battles.

 

Following practices, eager fans wait in line with memorabilia either worn or in their hands in hopes of having some of their favorite players sign it. Most teams hold training camp in an area where fans have to deal with the sweltering heat for hours before getting those autographs, and those players reward those fans, giving them something to smile about when they make the long drive back home.

It is safe to say Peyton Manning is the most popular player at Broncos training camp.

It is safe to say Peyton Manning is the most popular player at Broncos training camp.

It is a special time for fans because they know the preseason is coming soon and the regular season is just around the corner. But there is something that I have always disliked about training camp.

 

Before I say what that is, I want to explain why I feel this way and the perspective I am coming from.

 

As much as I am a fan, I am also a sports journalist, so I tend to be objective. More importantly, even though I love my Kansas City Chiefs, I am a realist. When a team is struggling, some fans have the notion that they should still be positive and supportive of their team. That is okay. Some fans believe that a team should rightfully be criticized when things get ugly. I fall in the latter, after all, if someone is being paid millions of dollars to underperform, fans have every right to form a negative opinion, as long as they truly believe in that opinion and can back it up with facts.

 

With that said, I want to go back to my “beef” with training camp.

 

I feel like the activity on the field in training camp is blown out of proportion. Some players get way too much hype.

 

I read tweets from fans and reporters as well as media reports on how a player, who not many people knew of before, made an electrifying play in camp.

 

Keep in mind, this player made that glorifying play against some unheralded backups. And those backups are likely to get cut. Their chances of making the 53-man roster are very slim.

 

When I hear a certain player makes a magnificent play in training camp, especially when it is against second, third or fourth stringers, I take it with a grain of salt.

Eagles Camp Football

Eagles fans look on during Eagles training camp.

Don’t get me wrong. When that player makes a nice play, it serves them well in the eyes of the coaches. At the same time, I’m sure those coaches know that one jaw dropping play won’t promise them a spot on the 53-man roster and that the flash needs to turn into consistency. That unknown playmaker will strengthen his chances of making the team, and he will soon become known to the fans.

 

If a player makes that big play in the preseason games against a first-string player, then the hype is for real.

 

As a Chiefs fan, I want to use one example. Bobby Sippio.

 

Sippio was an all-star wide receiver in the Arena Football League for the Chicago Rush. He won an ArenaBowl with the Chicago Rush and was named first-team All-Arena in 2007. Later that year, Sippio gave the NFL a second chance when he signed with the Chiefs.

 

The same year, HBO brought back its popular NFL training camp show, Hard Knocks. Hard Knocks goes in depth with one NFL team and its training camp and preseason moments with some special behind the scenes activity that not even the local media can capture.

 

When the Chiefs were on Hard Knocks in 2007, Sippio was highlighted and became the star of the show. Through good editing, Sippio looked like a 10-time Pro Bowler. His activity in training camp was great, but he only made the highlight reel when he faced backups who got cut.

 

He made the team in 2007, but saw very minimal action. In 2008, he scored two touchdowns in four preseason games, but they all occurred late in the games when teams are already using backups who are unlikely to make the team.

Bobby Sippio scores a touchdown in Week 4 of the 2008 preseason against the Rams. This was his last time wearing a Chiefs uniform.

Bobby Sippio scores a touchdown in Week 4 of the 2008 preseason against the Rams. This was his last time wearing a Chiefs uniform.

When the Chiefs worked on their 53-man roster, Sippio was an unfortunate casualty.

 

Point being: the hype is overdone. The media will publically note a player’s big play, but fans take that out of context and take it as if he’s secured a spot on the team.

 

When it comes to training camp, these are the things I look for:

1. How coaches are getting the team ready

2. How certain players are doing while trying to bounce back from a recent injury

3. Whether or not players are missing repetitions because of injury

4. Position battles as those are always big

5. What I said earlier, if an unfamiliar player is building his way up

 

I understand not everyone has the mindset I have when it comes to sports, and that’s perfectly okay.

 

When I covered KU football for student media at the University of Kansas, I didn’t make a big deal when sophomore quarterback Montell Cozart dominated KU’s defense in the 2014 Spring Game. But many KU hopefuls think Cozart has the secret to making KU competitive just because of one glorifying scrimmage. As much as I love my alma mater and hope I am wrong, KU fans are in for a big disappointment (and will want to hit the fast forward button to basketball season.)

 

Keep in mind, training camp is a fun time for football fanatics, but don’t overhype everything. The real hype begins in Week 1 of the regular season.